Source: Financial Times
News
May 20, 2015
"“We’re on the cusp of evolutionary change related to pensions. What we’re seeing is a clear indicator that courts are willing to treat pension beneficiaries as ahead of creditors,” says Thomas McLoughlin, head of municipal fixed income at UBS Wealth Management Americas. High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/9f5e7590-fec6-11e4-94c8-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz3b5ipxnKs ”That will transform the risk parameters for municipal finance. For years muni analysts looked at idiosyncratic credit risk, but now we are looking at a systemic risk related to pensions. It’s a really important trend we have to incorporate into our analysis. We have to focus far more on this in the future.”"
News
April 20, 2015
Japan’s aggressive renewable energy push after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster has stalled due to a combination of technical and political factors. And, while energy regulators are taking steps to help increase and more smoothly integrate green power, there are questions of how committed the country is to renewables.
News
Oct. 6, 2014
For decades, the German people have been among the world’s most environmentally conscious. The strongest sign of this has been the commitment of successive governments to Energiewende – or “energy change” – designed to make the economy predominantly dependent on renewable sources such as wind and solar power. Renewables today account for 23 per cent of electricity production, a figure set to rise to 65 per cent by 2035.

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This emphasis places burdens on households and businesses. The cost of the subsidies offered by the German government to green energy producers is passed on to consumers. Domestic energy bills are 48 per cent higher in Germany than the European average. Germany’s Mittelstand companies are even worse off. Their costs are twice the level facing their US rivals, many of whom benefit from cheap shale gas.
News
Feb. 27, 2014
Germany’s exports would have been €15bn higher last year if its industry had not paid a premium for electricity compared with international competitors, according to an analysis published on Thursday.
News
Oct. 23, 2013
David Cameron has vowed to cut consumer bills by reining back several green energy initiatives in a move that will set him on a collision course with his Liberal Democrat coalition partners. Mr Cameron, who once declared “vote blue, go green,” has found himself on the back foot amid double-digit-percentage rises in household energy bills and a renewed political focus on the “cost of living”.
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