Source: San Francisco Chronicle
News
Jan. 23, 2017
Public schools around California are bracing for a crisis driven by skyrocketing worker pension costs that are expected to force districts to divert billions of dollars from classrooms into retirement accounts, education officials said. The depth of the funding gap became clear to district leaders when they returned from the holiday break: What they contribute to the California Public Employees’ Retirement System, known as CalPERS, will likely double within six years, according to state estimates.
News
Jan. 2, 2017
The 2013 measure repealed a 10-year-old law that allowed employees with at least five years of service to purchase up to five years of credits before retiring, so that a worker who retired after 20 years would receive a pension based on as much as 25 years of contributions. . . The 2013 measure repealed a 10-year-old law that allowed employees with at least five years of service to purchase up to five years of credits before retiring, so that a worker who retired after 20 years would receive a pension based on as much as 25 years of contributions.
News
Dec. 16, 2016
The new monthly charge and interconnection fee kick in whenever the growing amount of rooftop solar power in a utility’s territory reaches a specific threshold, equal to 5 percent of the utility’s peak electricity demand. San Diego Gas and Electric Co. was the first utility to hit that mark, reaching it in June.
News
Nov. 2, 2016
To experience America’s crumbling infrastructure firsthand, look no farther than San Francisco and Oakland — ranked this week by a transportation research group as being home to the worst roads of any large urban region in the country.
News
Oct. 7, 2016
Now, a half-dozen years into Gov. Jerry Brown’s futuristic vision of carbon-free transportation, California is encountering even more potholes along the electric highway — obstacles born from both practicalities and politics. Consumers, put off by high costs and concerned about limited range, just aren’t buying into the state’s ambitious aims. Hybrid electric and fully electric cars have been stuck at only 3 percent of new cars sold in the state. Undaunted, the state intends that by 2025, zero-emission cars will make up 15 percent of California’s new car fleet — a fivefold increase. . . California has lagged in expanding ownership much beyond wealthier coastal areas. Research shows that higher-income neighborhoods are buying these cars at 10 times the rate of lower-income areas — a gap that’s widening.
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