Topic: Demographics
News
March 22, 2017
After years of being overrun by new residents drawn by a red-hot economy, the number of people moving out has begun to catch up with the number moving in, new census data show. In fact, in some parts of the Bay Area — including Santa Clara, San Mateo and Marin counties — already more people are leaving than arriving, according to the estimates released Thursday, which cover the period from July 1, 2015, to June 30, 2016. The same would be true in San Francisco if it weren’t for the high number moving in from abroad.
News
Feb. 5, 2017
Nowhere is this dynamic more evident than in California, where the state government has all but declared war on single-family homes by banning new peripheral development, driving up house prices throughout metropolitan areas. Regulatory fees typically add upward of $50,000, two-and-a-half times the national average; new demands for “zero emissions” homes promise to boost this by an additional $25,000.
News
Feb. 1, 2017
Fortune urged lawmakers to view black students as a high-needs population that should receive more funding, and to provide them with more educational choices by expanding who can authorize charter schools. She pointed out that of 13 predominantly African-American and low-income schools in California that are considered “high-achieving” on state assessments, 12 are charters.
News
Feb. 1, 2017
The speech, at a meeting of the California Latino Economic Institute, served as a counter-step to Gov. Jerry Brown’s indictment of Trump in his State of the State address last week. While echoing Brown’s characterization of California as a “beacon of hope” for other states and countries, Villaraigosa lamented rising home prices, stagnant wages and a state poverty rate that ranks highest in the nation when adjusted for the cost of living. . . .“So we can’t be truly progressive unless all of us in California are progressing together … Economic inequality has grown because our policies have not kept pace with our changing economy.”
News
Jan. 24, 2017
Several recent theories emphasize the negative effects of an aging population on economic growth, either because of the lower labor force participation and productivity of older workers or because aging will create an excess of savings over desired investment, leading to secular stagnation. We show that there is no such negative relationship in the data. If anything, countries experiencing more rapid aging have grown more in recent decades. We suggest that this counterintuitive finding might reflect the more rapid adoption of automation technologies in countries undergoing more pronounced demographic changes, and provide evidence and theoretical underpinnings for this argument.
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