06/27/2019

News

Lessons Learned From Measure EE: Not A Blank Check

The dust has settled on Measure EE, the 16-cent per square foot property tax rushed onto a June 4 ballot by the LAUSD board and its union. Following last week’s election results, politicians, pundits and school boards across the state are pondering EE’s meaning – trying to determine whether the parcel tax’s defeat was a […]

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Helping To Define What It Means To Be ‘Made In California’

Let me start with an admission: government officials—at all levels—don’t do a good job of engaging the public as we grapple with big, complex challenges. Hearings only go so far. Videos and social posts get into only so much detail and nuance. And, most importantly, most of what we do is based on how we […]

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More Aid For Older And Homeless Students In California’s Higher Education Budget

Buoyed by a flush state surplus, California lawmakers agreed Thursday on a state budget that will expand enrollment at the state’s higher education systems, keep tuition flat and particularly help older college students with tuition and living costs. In addition, $4 million will be available to study the possible construction of two new campuses in […]

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Another Hidden Cost Of College? How Student Parking Fees Are Subsidizing Faculty, Staff

Throughout college, Atticus Reyes traveled an hour each way from his upper valley home in Ojai to Cal State Channel Islands a few miles off Ventura County’s expansive coastline. Reyes arranged his first two years of classes so he would only be on campus two days a week—a strategy that allowed him to avoid hundreds […]

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And The Winner Is: “Calbright” Will Be The Name For California’s New Community College

In looking for a new name for California’s fledgling Online Community College, officials wanted something that would attract potential students to the promise of a better future in the Golden State. They also wanted a more widely encompassing moniker for an institution that won’t be only online, despite its original title. The somewhat surprising and […]

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Newsom’s Plan To Aid Parents Enrolled In California Colleges Runs Into Resistance

Gov. Gavin Newsom’s proposal to generously bolster state financial aid to California college students who are parents of dependent children – one of the most important pieces of his higher education plan – is facing strong opposition in the state Legislature. The governor’s plan would have cost an estimated $96.7 million a year and provided […]

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Student Loans Bill Of Rights Coming Soon To California

Is a student loan bill of rights coming to California? Here’s what you need to know. Student Borrower Bill of Rights On Tuesday, the California Assembly passed a first-in-the-nation “Student Borrower Bill of Rights,” which aims to protect borrowers with student loans. Sponsored by Assemblyman Mark Stone, the bill, AB 376, primarily targets student loan […]

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The Soul-Crushing Cost Of College In California, Explained

It’s not your grandparents’—or even your parents’—higher-ed system. A young Californian of the Baby Boomer generation, bolstered by the post-war economic boom and the state’s investment in public higher education, could often emerge from college with little to no debt and a clear path to a living wage and homeownership. Today’s California students, by contrast, […]

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New Report Finds Difficulty In Moving Up To Middle Class

A report from the California Business Roundtable says the state’s working poor are finding it harder than ever to move up the economic ladder toward the middle class. The roundtable’s president, Robert Lapsley, says the cost of living is the biggest barrier to upward mobility in the state. Lapsley says that’s in addition to cumbersome […]

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For Many Workers, ‘Gig Economy’ Has A Dark Side

The expanding gig economy in California is often praised for giving workers flexibility and independence. Be your own boss, set your own schedule, companies tout, and these companies would like us to think that drivers, cleaners and personal shoppers actually prefer the gig economy to traditional employment. The rosy spin ignores the reality for California’s […]

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Renewable Gas Really Is Too Good To Be True

As California ramps up efforts to improve air quality and reduce greenhouse gas emissions statewide, one polluting industry, in particular, is fighting to maintain relevance. In the face of local governments, state regulators, health professionals, and environmental groups calling for clean energy homes and buildings that can be powered with renewable electricity instead of gas, […]

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Get ready for a big fight over California’s property taxes in 2020

The initiative would make dramatic changes to the tax system established four decades ago by Proposition 13, which capped how much property tax bills could increase every year. The proposed measure would boost property tax revenues from commercial and industrial properties by assessing them at their current market value. Property tax protections would remain unchanged […]

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California’s poor students rank next to last on national test

California’s poor students performed worse on a national exam than needy kids from all but one other state, according to results released this week by the National Center for Education Statistics. Congratulations, folks. We beat Alaska. These students’ lackluster scores on the most recent National Assessment of Educational Progress come despite the state’s $31.2 billion […]

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Businesses Ramp Up Investment Despite Rising Rates

Executives have grown more optimistic about growth, in part anticipating that President-elect Donald Trump’s administration and Republican congressional majorities will bring regulatory rollbacks, corporate tax breaks and increased infrastructure spending.

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Tax Day 2016

While the most current complete tax data from the Franchise Tax Board is for 2013, the recently published zip code data enables some preliminary analysis for the 2014 receipts. By region, 40.3% of PIT revenues came from the Bay Area. More importantly, 51.2% of the increased PIT revenues in 2014 came from this region, once again illustrating how much California is reliant on a single region not only for continued jobs and employment growth, but the continued health of the state’s fiscal situation. Los Angeles, with 30% of the population, was the next largest region, paying 27.5% of total PIT and a 25.5% share of the increased PIT receipts. In the absence of state policies that promote more balanced and geographically dispersed jobs growth, California’s finances will likely continue to be reliant on the economic health of one region.

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