04/20/2018

News

California again ranks low in academic testing

There was a bit of good news for California in the federal government’s latest round of academic test results: it’s one of seven states that registered four-point gains in reading comprehension among eighth-graders. But that positive morsel in the 2017 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) testing of fourth- and eighth-graders released this week was […]

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California makes significant gain in reading on much anticipated national test

Led by strong scores in 8th-grade reading, California moved closer to the national averages in reading and math, continuing a decade-plus trend of generally slow but steady improvement on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. The closely watched assessment released its 2017 results for 4th and 8th grades on Tuesday. . . . In 4th-grade […]

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One Year of ‘College’ With No Degree, But No Debt And a Job at the End

MissionU, which enrolled its first class in September, is part of new breed of institutions that bill themselves as college alternatives for the digital age. The schools—whose admission rates hover in the single digits—comparable to the Ivy League, according to the schools—offer a debt-free way to attain skills in hot areas and guaranteed apprenticeships with […]

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In California, national test scores show enduring achievement gaps

California was one of just 10 states to post statistically significant increases in eighth-grade reading. In 2015, the average reading score for California eighth-graders was 259 on the 500-point test. In 2017, the average was 263. . . . Otherwise, the state’s scores on the test were flat, which the state Dept. of Education downplayed.

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Test Scores Show Students Made Little Progress in National Exam

American students had nearly flat results in math and reading on a national exam, continuing a pattern of stagnation over most of the past decade, as some of the lowest performers fell further behind. Eighth-graders made the only statistically significant gain—1 point—in reading, for an average score of 267 out of a possible 500, according […]

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Community college students guaranteed admission to UC if they meet certain course requirements

The University of California and the California Community Colleges agreed Wednesday that students who do well in courses that UC faculty helped develop will be admitted to a UC campus, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. The agreement will apply to students who begin community college in fall 2019. The courses will lead to an associate […]

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Where the New School Money Really Goes

School funding in California is at record levels: But school districts are cutting staff and holding down raises. That’s largely because they are subsidizing retirees at the expense of active employees. Eg, San Francisco Unified School District will spend >$40 million this year to subsidize health care spending by retirees and divert nearly $100 million […]

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Higher Education and Latinos in California

Hispanic Intenders and Parents of Intenders more likely than Non-Hispanics to support increased funding for higher education; More than half of Intenders, and Parents of Intenders support CA’s next Governor making post high school degree attainment a top priority Majority of all segments support making college affordability a priority (Intenders, Parents of Intenders, Non-Intenders) More […]

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Businesses Beg for More Low-Skill Visas, Putting White House in a Bind

Demand for low-skilled worker visas for the summer season starting Sunday is again far outstripping supply, with the Trump administration forced to choose between helping businesses seeking more visas or trying to save those jobs for American workers. Some lawmakers tried and failed this month to secure an increase in the number of H-2B visas […]

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The Ivy League Students Least Likely to Get Married

People care about matrimony for good reason. Society has been profoundly shaped by what academics call assortative mating: the tendency of people to marry others resembling themselves. Educationally assortative mating rose for decades after World War II, as more people went to college and more good jobs were reserved for college graduates. Income inequality is […]

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A Way Up, for All of Us

There’s only one solution for many of the challenges facing California — education, and not just for children, but especially for adults. Fully 75 percent of prison inmates failed to finish high school. The children of parents with low literacy skills are 72 percent more likely to be illiterate themselves, get poor grades, disrupt classrooms, […]

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Chronic absence rates high at many California continuation schools

California’s continuation high schools are meant to give students a last chance to get back on track for graduation, but state data reveal that many of the schools struggle with a basic challenge: Getting students to attend each day. Nearly 60 percent of continuation high school students were considered chronically absent during the 2016-17 school […]

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Politicians ignore looming higher ed crisis

Every bit of data tells us that California faces a potential crisis because it is failing to generate enough college-educated workers to replace retiring baby boomers and fill the demands of an increasingly sophisticated economy. That failure underscores the irrelevance of the state’s nearly 60-year-old “master plan” for higher education, which envisioned seamless, low-cost access […]

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California brain drain could be on horizon, as fewer local kids get into state colleges

Overcrowded campuses and increased international popularity is forcing the University of California and California State University schools to turn away thousands of eligible local students, an exodus that could lead to a brain drain in the state later. The worry that tens of thousands of bright, talented Californians could be leaving the state for good […]

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Proposed California State University tuition hikes anger students

California State University students may see their second consecutive tuition increase next year, but any decision on the $288 tuition increase question won’t come for another two months. The prospect of a delay, however, didn’t stop some students and faculty members from showing up to CSU headquarters in Long Beach on Tuesday in order to […]

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